woman planting in a small pot

7 Tips to Improve Your Organic Gardening Skills

It’s hard to find good produce in the store these days. Farmers use strip farming techniques to get a lot of tasteless fruit and vegetables, instead of fewer quality products. If this is a problem that affects your life, read on to find out how to make your own organic garden at home!

Tip # 1: Don’t Re-use Water with Chemicals

When watering plants use recycled water, but avoid re-using water from sources such as baths, washing machines, or dishwashing. These water sources may contain harmful chemicals that can be absorbed into your vegetables such as nitrates and phosphates. This water may even contain pathogens that could harm you or your plants.

Tiip # 2: Rotate Your Crops

You will need to rotate the plants on a regular basis when you have an indoor organic garden. Plants need to get light from all directions in order to grow properly. If they are not rotated, plants will bend toward a light source, which can actually cause them to produce less fruits and vegetables, than they would have if they had been rotated.

Tip # 3: Protect Them Seeds

Keep your seeds warm and humid. Most seeds are healthy at a temperature of about seventy degrees. Place your pots next to a heating vent or install an additional heater if needed. You can cover your pots with plastic films so that the seeds can keep their humidity and warmth.

Tip # 4: Train Your Plants

Are you busy with your organic garden? Remember, before you replant your flowers or vegetables outside in cooler weather, you need to get them ready for the change in temperature and light! For a few weeks, move your plants to a colder spot with no light for a few hours. Gradually increase the amount of time you leave your plants in the cold. After a few weeks, your plants should be ready for the cooler outdoors.

Tip # 5: Give Them the Time They Deserve

Tend to your garden a few steps at a time. A garden requires ongoing maintenance, and becomes a big time drain if you let things pile up until the weekend. Stop by the garden for a few minutes each day and deadhead some flowers while you’re waiting for dinner to cook or pull a few weeds while watching the kids play.

Tip # 6: Plant Your Own Food

Plant ornamental, edible plants as part of your regular yard landscaping. Good plants to start with include rosemary, thyme varieties, sages, oregano and basil. These all look great mixed with perennials, and they will supply you with enough that you won’t need to purchase them anymore – herbs are expensive at the supermarket.

Tip # 7: Basket is Your Friend

When it’s harvest time, you should utilize a basket that you put laundry in to carry your veggies. This laundry basket can be used as a type of strainer for all your produce. Doing this allows you to both rinse and drain your fresh produce.

An organic garden right in your home is a great thing to have. You’ll love the fresh, organic produce that you pull right out of your back yard, for free! Apply the tips from this article now, to stop relying on farmers, who are only out to make a quick buck. Start enjoying quality produce, right from your own home.

man watering crops with 2 buckets

7 Great Ideas for Your Organic Gardening Woes

When you think of organic gardening, do you just see it as something that takes a long time to grow without pesticides? If so, then you have a very narrow view of the subject. Organic gardening is so much more than that and it can be personalized so that it works for you. Read on to find out how.

Idea # 1: Make Full Use of Containers

Take care of your containers. You do not have to spend a lot of money on containers: you can reuse common items as pots. Make sure you clean your containers thoroughly and disinfect them to avoid diseases. Drill a few holes in the bottom so that the extra water can be drained.

Idea # 2: Seed Sprout Are Stronger

When your seeds sprout, they will not be in need of the warmth they needed to germinate. Sprouting plants can be removed from the heat source. Take off any plastic that is on the containers to keep away from warmth and moisture. Watch your seeds closely to know how to go about this.

Idea # 3: Help Mother Nature a Little

While Mother Nature will eventually do the work needed to create compost from a backyard pile, even if it is not actively tended, you can give her a helping hand by adding compost starter to the mix. Compost starters, available from the garden centers, add microorganisms to the soil that help speed up the decay process.

Idea # 4: Earthworms are Great!

Embrace earthworms in the organic garden! Earthworms are an organic gardener’s best friend. Through tunneling and their nitrogen-rich castings, they can help to aerate the soil. This improves the amount of oxygen that gets to a plant’s roots, improves water retention capacity, and keeps the soil loose and workable. They actually raise much-needed minerals from the garden’s subsoil to the topsoil, where plants can get the greatest benefit. These worms also break up hardpan soil, which is detrimental to root growth.

Idea # 5: Organic Mulch FTW!

To conserve water when you’re gardening, be sure to use three inches of organic mulch. The mulch will help your plants to absorb the water slowly over time, allowing you to use less water than you normally would. Many natural materials make great mulch, including pine needles and many types of leaves.

Idea # 6: Healthy Fruits have Colorful Flowers

Blend flowering fruit shrubs into your regular landscape. Don’t have a separate area to turn into a garden? Elderberries, blueberries and currants have pretty flowers in springtime and look great in the fall as well. The side benefit of these landscape-enhancing plants is all the fruit they produce for you to enjoy.

Idea # 7: Use Diatomaceous Earth as Pesticide

If you are experiencing a problem with slugs or other insects, a wonderful organic contact pesticide is diatomaceous earth. You can buy this at most garden centers, and it comes in a white powder form. It is an abrasive material that will kill the critters by damaging the skin of the slugs and joints of the insects.

After reading through all of that, do you still see organic gardening in the same way? Do you now see that it is so much more than a pesticide-free garden? The work involved is not too bad, but it will take effort and patience to grow an organic garden of your own.